Stretching Garments Prior to Heat Pressing

Some screen printers, who print directly onto t-shirts or who print plastisol heat transfers, will stretch the garment before printing or heat pressing. By doing this, the weave of the shirt opens up allowing the ink to better penetrate the fibers of the fabric. This practice is believed to prevent cracking of the ink.  Read more »

Preventing Wall Graphics Failures

Getting good adhesion to painted wall surfaces has been a problem for sign makers and the manufacturers of vinyl films. Flat finish paints are especially a problem. To help your customer avoid the pitfalls that result in vinyl graphics falling off the wall, here are some guidelines to follow before beginning a wall graphics installation. Read more »

Supply55, Inc. and NEPATA GmbH announce strategic partnership for NEPATA converting centers

Supply55, Inc. a leading provider of value added products to the sign, screen and graphic arts market is pleased to announce a strategic partnership with NEPATA GmbH for the distribution of NEPATA covering equipment in North America. NEPATA converting centers are the most successful and widely used converting centers world-wide. Engineered and manufactured in Germany […] Read more »

Comparing Heat Transfer Films with Screen Printed Graphics

A high quality polyurethane heat transfer film will outlast a screen printed garment hands down. In fact, if you properly process and care for a polyurethane heat transfer, the applique should last the life of the garment.  We all know what happens to a screen printed shirt after a dozen washes.  Plastisol inks crack. By […] Read more »

How to Flash Press FlexCut™ Sticky LT

Heat Transfer Tip Saves Time & Money RTape has a new heat transfer solution that saves time and money. Here’s how. When decorating a heat sensitive fabric, RTape’s FlexCut™ Sticky LT (low temperature) is typically heat pressed at 235°F (115°C) for 17 seconds Read more »

The Differences Between Polyurethane and Vinyl Films

Many in our industry use the all-encompassing term “heat transfer vinyl” to refer to any heat transfer flex film.  The fact of the matter is that many of the heat transfer films on the market today are not vinyl at all. Much of what is sold today is polyurethane or a polyurethane blend. Read more »